👋 Teachers! Introduce yourself here


(Ziad Saab) #43

Hello! My name is Ziad Saab. I’m a teacher and co-founder at DecodeMTL, a web development bootcamp in Montreal, Canada.

We use GitHub for our organization @decodemtl. All the projects our students do are forked on GitHub and we use pull requests to monitor the students’ work.

As a full-stack JavaScript bootcamp, here are some examples of the projects our students are working on:

React GitHub Explorer: https://github.com/ziad-saab/react-github-api-project/

All our workshops are under the MIT license so feel free to poke around and ask questions :slight_smile:


(Mackenzie) #44

Hello!

I’m Mackenzie. I’m a JavaScript developer, and I’m a program lead at RED Academy in Vancouver, BC. This means I teach, develop curriculum and work on software projects at RED! We use Github extensively and depend on it to deliver our classes. I Love teaching, and I love software development… I’m glad to see this initiative to bring together tech educators and I’m excited to contribute.


(Erwin Debusschere) #45

Hey, greetings from Argentina!

My name is Erwin but I also go as @Charlyzzz online :slight_smile:
Apart from pursuing my engineering degree (only 1 year missing, yay!) and some freelance work, my time is divided into my two passions: programming and teaching.

I try to be as open-minded as possible, experimenting and trying new tools/languages everyday.

My alma mater is Universidad Tecnológica de Buenos Aires FRBA, where I co-teach with really awesome people, whom I really look up to, in three subjects:

  • Paradigms of programming
    It’s focused on comparing how each paradigm (functional with Haskell, logical using SWI-Prolog and OOP using Wollok, our own language) has tools, ways of thinking and good habits, but there are also key transversal considerations.
    Some of the topics mentioned are lack of side-effects, composition, delegation, declarativity, polymorphism and composition.
    Besides Wollok, part of our effort is into Mumuki, an E-learning platform that improved a lot our students performance!

  • Design of systems
    It’s a full dive into the OOP world: design patterns, TDD, BDD, refactors, VCS, CI, ORM, Web, UI and a lot of other things we consider important.

  • Advance techniques of programming
    We try to teach the students metaprogramming (taking advantage of Ruby’s metamodel) and object-functional programming (with Scala).

Cheers!


(Kieran Healy) #46

Hello,

I’m Kieran Healy (@kjhealy on Github and elsewhere). I am a sociologist, and I teach at Duke University in North Carolina. I am interested in data visualization, doing reproducible work in plain text, and related topics. I do data analysis mostly in R and spend a lot of time trapped inside Emacs.


(Dale Reed) #47

I’m Dale Reed, Clinical Professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago. I’m teaching the capstone programming course this semester, and thought we should experience a version control system. I want to use differences between file versions as a mechanism for providing feedback on student programming assignment submissions. Anyone done this?


(Biren) #48

Hey Friends,

I’m Biren. I have been involved in teaching activity for many years. Primarily, I teach Service Oriented Architecture and Web Development to the undergraduate students at Dharmsinh Desai University, Nadiad, India. It has always been my hobby to learn new as well as unconventional things. And, in that pursuit, I am also studying at Free Code Camp.

I’m looking forward to unleash the potent power of GitHub.Plus, I would love to initiate long lasting conversation with like minded teachers and students around the globe.

Thank you very much.


(Eden Burton) #49

Hello …

I teach an course on system analysis and another capstone course at the college level.

I am admittedly new to GitHub as I have used cvs and svn as a version control repository in the past. Hopefully this group will point me to some good educational material for my students (and myself) to learn about using and setting up Github repos.


(James Tompkin) #50

Hello, I’m James Tompkin, and I’m going to teach graphics, vision, and interaction at Brown in Providence, RI in the fall. In the past, I’ve been part of a team teaching visualization topics to undergraduates, and part of that was teaching D3 and the webdev pipeline including GitHub. I think there is a lot of value when general-purpose tools can overlap with education goals, so I’m pleased by GitHub’s efforts to engage the community at this venue.


(Gail Kaiser) #51

I’m a professor at Columbia University who teaches software engineering every fall semester. I’ve previously used a locally hosted git server but this fall I plan to tell my students to use github.


(Hector Alfaro) #52

Hi all! :wave:

My name is Hector (@hectorsector on GitHub). My day job is as a trainer for GitHub.

When I’m not training, I teach intro to programming for Valencia College out of :sunny: Orlando, FL!

Living in Orlando means that I’m very interested in theme parks :roller_coaster: and entertainment in general. I do enjoy tinkering with new tech often but I ultimately :heart: collaborating with others and, so, GitHub has been :sparkles: amazing for me.

I look forward to building relationships with you all!


(Jason Stuart) #53

Hi all, I’m Jason, I teach English at Slippery Rock University. We are not a research university, but I’ve been doing more coursework with web writing and documentation. If anybody wants to talk @ writing, feel free.


(Vicky Steeves) #54

Hi! My name is Vicky Steeves. I’m the Librarian for Research Data Management and Reproducibility at New York University. I have a Bachelor’s in Computer Science and a Master’s in Library Science.

I teach a number of courses surrounding proper stewardship of research materials, open to the NYU community at large. I also take individual and group consultations. I teach the principles and ethics of open science, open source, and open data as a part of my classes, and use GitHub to do so!

I spend most of my time writing :pencil2:, reading :book:, learning :blue_book: and hanging out :beers:. I’m @VickySteeves on GitHub and Twitter.

Cheers,
Vicky


(Sahil Babbar) #55

Hi all,

I am Sahil Babbar and work as a Board of Director at The Aashansh Foundation, India, which is a non-profit organisation with a passion to bring socially and economically weaker students to the same podium of education as an average student.

I can be reached via my website http://sahilbabbar.github.io


(Dave Reed) #56

Hi, I’m Dave Reed. I teach computer science at Capital University. We use GitHub in our software engineering course and I encourage our students to use git and GitHub for their own personal coding projects. I also develop iOS apps. I wrote Attendance and Attendance2 and am finishing up the first release of a whiteboard drawing/presentation app that I wrote with one of my students the last 5 or so months.

I’m still considering using GitHub as a way for students to submit their assignments to me, but haven’t determined the based way to do that yet. Currently, I have them email them to me and then I use an AppleScript to extract the attachments from the messages and create directories based on their email address and save the attachment in their directory.


(Peter Bell) #57

Hi There!

I’m Peter Bell. I teach at Columbia Business School - helping MBA students to figure out how to use GitHub to collaborate with their engineering teams. I also run the online instructional team at Flatiron School - a developer bootcamp in NYC (although I live in Boulder, Co). I also wrote “Introducing GitHub” along with Brent Beer - a Hubber now living in Europe and created “Mastering GitHub” for CodeSchool (now Pluralsight) and “Git and GitHub LiveLessons” for Pearson.

I’m also a contract member of the GitHub training team, teaching organizations how to better use Git and GitHub and have also done a little “teach the teacher” work at a couple of colleges helping professors to better teach the GitHub Flow. Feel free to drop me a line any time - peter@pbell.com. Looking forward to connecting with, contributing to and learning from this community!

Best Wishes,
Peter


(Matthew Brett) #58

I’m Matthew Brett - @matthew-brett on github.

I teach brain imaging analysis at UC Berkeley… Our course website is http://practical-neuroimaging.github.io. We have been teaching git and version control in the previous iterations of our course, but this year we’re going to switch to basing all our assignments on github from the start.


(Lisa J. Miller) #59

Hi I’m Lisa Miller lizajane999 on GitHub. I teach Java and C++ introductory programming and discrete math at Kapiolani Community College in Honolulu. I’m also a PhD student in machine learning at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

This Fall semester will be my first attempt at using GitHub in the classroom. I’m going to start out with my 2nd semester Java class and am really excited to introduce the students to git and GitHub! Hopefully all goes well. I may be asking for help from all of you soon! :wink:


(Luciano Selzer) #60

Hello, my name is Luciano Selzer. I live in Ushuaia.
I’m a biologist and teach stats to undergrads.
I saw a conference in RUsers 2016 about using GitHub and CI to help with teaching R. So I thought I’ll give it a try.

In a few weeks the course will start so I hope it goes smoothly.


(Covenant Cs) #61

Hi, my name is John Hunt
I teach CS at a small college in Chattanooga.
I am hoping to introduce gethub into my classes soon.


(Armando Fox) #62

I’m Armando Fox. I teach Software Engineering (and other things) at UC Berkeley, and with Dave Patterson, co-wrote the book “Engineering Software as a Service”, designed specifically for higher-ed classroom use (but seems to be popular among professionals too) and co-created the free online edX.org course sequence “Agile Web Development Using Ruby on Rails”. We even have a program that allows higher-ed teachers in brick-and-mortar or virtual universities to use our online materials including autograders, quizzes, etc. as a “course in a box” that they can customize for their students; contact me if interested. We’ve been using GitHub since forever in my course and most other Berkeley courses, and we were even featured in a GitHub Octotales video about how our student teams use GitHub to build SaaS projects pro-bono for nonprofits. I’m passionate about not only teaching good development but instilling a desire in students to use those skills for the greater good, and welcome inquiries from anyone wanting to leverage our efforts/materials to spread that approach!