Module 4 Exercise 1: Student programs


(Chris Cannon) #81

:100: Hope you saw the announcement this week that we have added several very high demand products to the Student Developer Pack! :sparkles:


(Chris Cannon) #82

Great stuff @mhudnell! I look forward to meeting some motivated Chapel Hill students through programs like Campus Experts!


(Chris Cannon) #83

Looking forward to seeing your students put this to use!


(Chris Cannon) #84

Make sure you check this out about requesting swag for your students!


(Chris Cannon) #85

Hope to see some of your students in Campus Experts training soon! :sparkling_heart:


(Baptiste Pesquet) #86
  • Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

I work as a CS teacher in one of France’s grandes écoles, the National Engineering School of Cognitics (in French: Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Cognitique). Cognitics is a pretty recent scientific field stuying the interactions between humans and IT systems. It stands at a crossroads of diverse fields such as computer and social sciences, biology, psy- chology, but also artificial intelligence and linguistics, neurology or philosophy.

GitHub is pretty heavily used in almost all of the CS-related courses during our three years long curriculum.

  • Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

Often students come to me asking for a private repository in one of our GitHub organizations, not knowing the Student Developer Pack could give them what they need (and more!).

Some of our students would probably be interested in becoming Campus Experts. i’ll tell them about this program.

  • What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

Probably convince more colleagues in non CS-related fields to try using GitHub too :wink:


(Chris Jones) #87

Within the computer science department we have a small set of student groups, but they seem to emphasize more presentation rather than coding or software engineering. I know some of the students have participated in local hackathons, but nothing sponsored by the university or department that I know of. More importantly, there are not many instructors teaching Git much less evangelizing it’s use to students so that they could better understand how it could help them, not just with their code, but with everything else they’re working on in school.

I think the Campus Expert program would be incredibly valuable simply because it emphasizes skills beyond the technical, which our students will need to truly excel in industry. The Developer Pack would be close second since it provides access to a huge number of tools that could be used within other classes.

As far as what I’d need to encourage the growth of these kinds of communities, I think I’d need some good stories. I’ve seen, and participated in, an attempt to found a student chapter of the IEEE Computer Society on campus, and our biggest stumbling block was generating and sustaining interest. Our students have so many ways that they could spend their time that they need a compelling, tangible reason to choose to participate in a tech community over the alternatives.


(Pol Benedito Momplet) #88

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
In Ubiqum Code Academy we train people to become Full-Stack Web Developers and Data Analytics
2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
“The GitHub Student Developer Pack”.
3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
Less theory and more practise, motivate people with cool projects, no one care about theory, but everyone love cool things. People love to do things not to read about cool things that other people do.


(Jason T. Mickel) #89
  1. There are a number of informal groups but nothing that is regular and robust to my knowledge. For example, there was interest in creating a data science club; however, the interests, understandably, ebb and flow with the student population.

  2. For us, I think the Campus Experts piece would offer a great opportunity to promote good practices in code development while simultaneously training strong, active community leaders. I could picture those students using that advantage to gain internships with Github or others. In turn those students will help faculty get other students on board.

  3. For the new minor we have launched in digital culture and information, we need to begin by integrating the git/Github workflow into our processes so that our students begin to assume its use and adjust to the workflow.


(Patrick Reimers) #90

As far as I know, there aren’t any student communities. :frowning_face:

The GitHub developer pack is packed with lots of tools the students could use to learn and build own ideas. out of these ideas, communities could be created.

With the GitHub education program, I would try to convice our students to sit together and create communities. (It’s more fun when doing somthing together, than doing ot alone)


(Edward A. Roualdes) #91

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
At CSU, Chico, we have a student community named Community Coding. Community Coding is a free space, open to anybody near our campus (students, faculty, and the local community) who wants to learn more about, practice, or share their coding. Occasionally, we have presentations by local experts. We’re working on spreading the word about reproducible research and I feel that GitHub is a big part of this message.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
I wish I knew sooner about the GitHub Developer Pack. This is a great idea to help motivate students to learn new tools. I’m also excited about the potential grant for hackathons. Our campus has just started competing in ASA’s DataFest, and this money would really help us advertise more broadly.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
Let’s me start with the two thoughts above, GitHub Developer Pack and the hackathon grant money, and then go from there. This community seems quite responsive, which is great. Thanks for the responsiveness so far and in the future.


(Hhezeldin) #92

great artticle


(Héricles Emanuel) #93

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

We have the ‘Guardians’ community, which serves to acquire technological group knowledge, maintain the laboratories and develop solutions for the use of the Computer Science course. In addition, we have the PET, Tutorial Education Program, which also provides support to students and mini-courses. I feel that the areas of action of these communities are restricted. I imagine that a more open community that students could attend and teach each other would be a good idea.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I imagine that the Github Student developer pack provides materials and tools that are great for exercising the technological learning, in addition, Git as a version control tool helps the organized development of student projects and solutions. As such, GitHub Classroom allows for more detailed classroom monitoring and how projects are being developed. Through the Campus Advisor, I intend to influence the communities of my campus, and to increase the technological knowledge of the community. I also want to join the Campus Expert Program, and be able to further encourage the community.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I think the materials provided by GitHub are good. I also think that alone, the work will be more costly. So having more people I can count on would be good. I will recommend colleagues to join the program so that we can have a better outcome with the community. I hope to have the support of the course coordination to implement strategies to increase the knowledge of students and stakeholders through internal programs, hackathons, etc …
My present knowledge is still little compared to what I have yet to learn. A very important thing would be to have the help of someone who could help me gain knowledge so that I could pass it on. Apparently this will not be a problem, as I have you and the entire github education community. :heart:


(Paul Inventado) #94

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

There are several technical student communities at Cal State Fullerton such as the ACM club, ACM-W club, Video Game Development Club, Data Science and Machine Learning Club, Offensive Security Society, and so forth. I focused on societies that mostly serve Computer Science students as that is my department, but these communities have members from other colleges as well.

I see a gap between the types of projects developed in these student communities and those in industry. Students often develop small and occasionally medium-sized applications, but I believe that they should have opportunities to build large software projects developed by multiple teams that continue to grow over time. This can give students a peek at the complexity of industry-grade systems and the give them experience in managing such large code bases.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I think the Github Student Developer Pack would be a great start to create spaces where students can collaborate on building and maintaining large code bases. Students who collaborate on these projects have the added benefit of learning about versioning software like git, and get exposed to using Github for their own projects, which many companies are now utilizing to select interns and future employees. Their contributions automatically become part of their portfolio.

I understand the Github Student Developer Pack is already given freely to students, so Github Campus Experts would be a nice addition to ensure students learn essential skills to engage in tech projects. Having campus experts also provide opportunities to pay it forward by supporting other students who are interested in tech projects.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I think the first step would be to spread the word. CSUF has many talented students who, unfortunately, are unaware of tech opportunities in student communities or do not have the resources to support their involvement in such projects. Hosting hackathons, workshops and trainings, showcasing projects, posting research opportunities, and offering scholarships are just some of the activities we can do to foster student interest. From there, I’m confident that the students can do the rest.


(Brian Crites) #95
  1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

There are a number of major technical communities taking the majority interest in programing on my campus including IEEE, ACM, SWE, and a InfoSec team. These orgs primarily serve the CS, CE, and EE communities with SWE bridging across the engineering disciplines. We also have a number of engineering societies not primarily interested in development such as BMES who I have worked with to do specialty technical workshops on subjects of interest that involve programming. There are also a number of secondary societies who utilize programming but don’t really have formal outreach with an engineering org such as the Cosplay Brigade which has a lot of small embedded systems in their designs. The core programming and larger engineering orgs have a lot of support from the university but the main gap I see is in reaching across organizations to create workshops and projects that cross interest groups.

  1. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I think the Student Developer Pack is one of the most useful tools for on-campus students generally. This gives them access to a wide array of tools that could support projects across a number of different interests.

  1. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I think the two primary things we need to grow our tech communities are to encourage them to try and reach a wider audience with their events through things like more consistent workshop series and splitting them between intro courses designed for non-programming majors and more advanced classes for special interests and people with some prior training. Getting these types of regular events can be difficult when you have an organizing board that is shifting every year.


(Thomas Sauerwald) #96

There are no student communities at our school yet, but i plan to initiate an hackathon. Is the grant also available to schools over in Germany? I would like to create ideas for education regarding our nao robots. Furthermore the Campus Experts program will push the new community and the Student Developer Packs supports every student with her or his individual goals. Last, but not least, is the a field day in western Germany comming? Or do you offer internships in Germany? All answers are appreciated.


(George Stavrinos) #97
  1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
    I am working in a research lab, so we can mainly use it for intern students. We are heavily using ROS as a robotics framework, and need a quick way to introduce interns to it. Github classroom seems very helpful for that.

  2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
    I think the student developer program is by far the best one. It offers amazing discounts (even free!) resources for students that can greatly boost their productivity! Kudos for doing that, github! :heart:

  3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
    I think the only way to do it, is add meaningful exercises both for individual and group solving. The rest will come with time :slight_smile:


(Pedro Prieto) #98

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

At the moment there are no technical student communities on my campus. We are a vocational education institution which offers 2 year associate degrees. Students stay for one year and a half in college and the remaining half year in a company as interns. There isn’t much time for them to engage in a community. In addition to this, there isn’t much tradition about these kind of communities in Spain.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I think that the Campus Experts program would be interesting for the students. The contents seem attractive and the program may offer them good opportunities to get job offers. GitHub developer pack is very attractive for them too: I think it provides them with a certain level of recognition as semi-professional developers.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on
campus?

Tools like GitHub allow students to participate in state-of-the-art technologies that are used in the real world. Sometimes in the academic world the classes are too narrow: programming fundamentals, database theory,… Students usually work on their own, on small individual projects. Tools like GitHub allow them to gain a sense of community, to know other projects, to build and publish their portfolio, to collaborate with people from all over the world,… I think they become more open minded to explore other kinds of learning different from regular classes.

That said, time is the main problem. Students do not have time to invest in a tech community. They come from 3pm till 9pm everyday. We have some seminars with some local tech companies, but that’s all. We are planning a congress with other nearby colleges: tech talks and some hands-on seminars. Maybe in the future we can organize a small Hackathon.

So, what would we need? Some ideas about hand-on software projects that can engage our students and some perks to motivate them.

By the way, thanks for the training! I already knew most of the contents (Git basics, GitHub Classroom,…) but there are others which were unknown to me (Visualizing Git, i.e.). It also connects all pieces together and gives a good picture of how to use GitHub in class.


(Osvaldo Jimenez) #99
  1. Describe current technical communities
    We have an ACM club and that’s it. We really should be doing more, but they are the ones in charge of doing some development, I think there is a gap in having students think more about gaining experience with the latest frameworks and tech, and contributing to open source or education is the big gap that I see.

  2. Choose a github program that could support communities.
    I think this whole idea of the Campus Experts. I’ve been using it in my classroom and have been responsible for introducing students to git and github (other teachers use other sites that won’t be mentioned here) but what they learn is tainted based on my experiences of trying to teach an entire classroom git. I think having a program like what you have outlined as a campus expert is something that I think would be wonderful to encourage my students to do more of. Currently I ask them to signup for the github student pack, but I should nudge them or the club to take on trying to go through this campus training that github offers.

  3. What would I need in order to support the growth of student communities?
    I think something that shows that the industry and maybe that github is in fact “watching” and supporting them. I think sometimes students don’t realize that what they are doing is in fact preparing them to be better software developers and learning git and participating in open source projects is something that most software companies would support and want to encourage them to do. I think most students in my programs don’t always see the long term goal of contributing to open source yet expect that companies will just hire them. I think if there’s just some recognition or encouragement or support of students working on projects and continuing to build their skills that may be a good motivator for students to keep going and to work on becoming better developers.


(Chris Cannon) #100

I couldn’t agree more! I’ve been trying on my campus to get more than just software developers to realize how powerful this kind of collaboration is!