Module 4 Exercise 1: Student programs


(Vanessa) #21

@OmalPerera let us know where and when to send swag:


(Omal Perera) #22

@mozzadrella

Wow! That’s really nice. :star_struck:

By the way I’m developing a virtual classroom with Programming language assignments (WIP) and already hosted in github pages. (cis-sandbox.github.io)

And I’m very much happy to say, I’m going to introduce it to our IS department & to all IS & CS undergraduates with the official support of the faculty in next few weeks.
so, I can distribute swags in that event

Hope it will be a real breakthrough! :raised_hands:

Some of the Screenshots :smiley:


(Mark Michon) #23

Ooooh that looks awesome! I’ll take a look. Thanks!


(Benjamin Soltoff) #24

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

Our research computing center offers frequent workshops throughout the year demonstrating how to implement many different methods and programs on their servers. Some of our students partake, but mostly they learn through their coursework. Students form their own independent study groups to review material and implement technical methods. A few students recently started a local chapter of R Ladies which appears to be quite popular. Within our program there is generally a good camaraderie, but it is still a tough program and teaching students the needed skills is sometimes difficult for lack of time.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

Frankly the student developer pack probably has the most use for our students. The benefits from GitHub alone make it worth it. Many of them will use private repos to organize their research projects and code. We encourage students to publish publicly and use an open-source ethos, but many are still hesitant to do this when the repo is mainly for their academic research projects. If they are writing programs/software they are more open to public repos. The Amazon AWS credits and other cloud computing tools would also be useful post-graduation, but right now they have access to free computing resources on-campus so the value is lower.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

More opportunities to collaborate on projects/tools of their own interest. It is always difficult to push students to do more work beyond the required classes (especially when they already take a lot of time), but facilitating and subsidizing hackathons focused on a theme interesting to our students (computational social science) could be rewarding. Hosting a hackathon, fronting some prize money, and providing a collaborative work environment might help engage the students and get them working together in an open-source and collaborative manner.


(Evan Misshula) #25
  1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your
    campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
  • We are a municpal public college and the largest Latino serving
    institution in NY State. We have a CS club that I used to be the
    advisor for when I was full time. We have seen a surge in CS majors
    from 60 to more than 700 in the last four years. We are introducing
    courses in Python and now offer free Python instruction during
    community hour this semsester for anyone who wants to learn during
    our community hour. I also teach Python as an example of an Object
    Oriented language in my Programming Languages class. We do no special
    outreach to underserved communities and that is a major gap.
  1. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your
    on-campus student communities?
  • We desperately need to impliment your campus expert program at John Jay.
    These kids need to be connected and collaborating with the wider world. Sadly,
    I was not even aware of this program before this training.
  1. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student
    tech communities on campus?
  • It would be great if we could promise mentoring or an internship if
    students complete the Campus Expert program. According to CUNY’s
    2014 student life survey 78% of CUNY students work to pay family
    expenses. Many of them are working for $10 an hour. These outside
    commitments retard their development as engineers. Even the promise
    of small amounts of money would encourage students to participate in
    open source communities.

(Vanessa) #26

Please feel free to share the module four slides with your students. Many, if not most, of our interns come from the Campus Experts program. We do underwrite student travel for technical events when they represent GitHub. There are paid opportunities further along in the program, but Google’s Summer of Code might be perfect for your students’ needs.


(Joe Nash) #27

Hey @EvanMisshula :wave: thanks so much for your enthusiasm for the Experts program.

At present, the sign up for new students is closed whilst we make room for the next batch. However, I want to make sure your students can get going without delay, so if you find a student that’s interested, please feel free to email me on joenash@github.com and we’ll get them added to the training :sparkling_heart:.


(Evan Misshula) #28

Thank you both so much. My git skills are still evolving but I am a huge fan of Free and Open Source software. The most important part is collaboration. These opportunities are literally life changing for these kids (and for me). Thank you for the great work you both do!


(Evan Misshula) #29

@mozzadrella - Can you please send a campus advisor invitation to my colleague.

I am sure that he would be very interested in becoming a Campus Advisor as well.

Thank you,
Evan


(Miren Berasategi) #30

I’m at the Faculty of Social Sciences and teaching at the Communication Degree, so no actual technical student communities here. I’m trying to bring our communication/journalism students into tech however, because I think that it is a required skill these days.

The swag bags are something that students found appealing during the last semester (stickers specially). I’m thinking about how to integrate Classroom with our current digital and online platforms, and git and Github in particular as a substitute of wikis for our co-creation activities. The Student Developer Pack is something I have to look into, but us not being developers or with a technical profile, it may be difficult to introduce to students in a way that pays off for them.

I would probably need more training myself, and more confidence on the ways and methods to implement Github into our workflow (which I’m sure is beneficial and enabling for our student profile). Then I may be self-confident enough to try and convince some colleagues to team up with me!


(Ricardo Martin Marcucci) #31

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

Our student populations in computer Engineering is a little low, so there are no organized groups as clubs or communities. Me and other teachers are trying to make workshops about tools and technologies to put them in track. By now there are a little group of 6 that are willing to start something related. I have already told them about Campus Experts

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

We told them about Github student Pack the day we teach GIT and development tools. Student in general are very enthusiastic about free domain to host some kind of project.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

Now I’m trying to give this free workshops about new technologies, (React, ES6/7, Node.js, Electron, etc). In cases I try to use GIT and Github as much as I could to show them the workflows used in the professional life.
In particular trying to get involved some students on some kind of club about codding, 3D printing, etc.

Thanks GitHub and @mozzadrella for this opportunity and all the great tools you share with teachers.


(Vitor Rios) #32

As far as I know, those communities are pretty much non-existant, or they do not reach much beyond their institutes to the larger campus. In my institute (Biology Institute, at the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil), there are no tech clubs or anything of the sort. I am trying to initiate a culture of coding and using github, but most biologists have a strong resistance to coding, and prefer using ready-made software for their analyses. I teached an introductory R class last semester, and used github to host the course materials, using the wiki feature of the repository, as I was not aware of the Classroom feature.

By far the Student Developer Pack, the private repositories are a must for graduate students.

I don’t know about the whole campus, but I am starting an organization repository for the Lab I work on. The trick is to get ecologists and zoologists to code, and to share their code. People here are still too protective of their code, and still don’t have an Open Source mentality. Last semester’s class was a huge progress, but insitutional support for coding classes at the Biology Institute is rather weak. I will help a fellow teacher this semester on a C++ modelling class, and intend to used Github Clasroom, it will be a nice experience


(Tess Homan) #33

– Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
I didn’t manage to find any. It might be that (since it’s a technical only university) students find enough friends to talk about tech stuff among their peers. Also, the university organises events such as a hackathon.
– Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities? What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
I guess students get the most benefit from the student developer pack. All students here get a technical education, but I feel that so much of the programming nowadays is self-taught. Later on it will be essential for the students to master new formats and languages by them selfs. The best way to ensure that they can do this is to open the developer world for them as early as possible. Getting starting with GitHub during your studies makes sure that the “scary” part is over, and you can start enjoying the community.
– What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
For now I think we are fine. Personally I hope to include GitHub classroom in my new courses to get students working with Git, and to make life easier for me :slight_smile:


(Alexander L. Hayes) #34

Checking in from the CS Department at the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD). I would rate the existing communities as fairly strong: school hackathons are sponsored from time-to-time and our department is supportive.

I think there is large opening for collaboration between students and researchers. There is some work to organize software developed by labs in our CS Department, but this gets harder to track the further you zoom out.

Having campus experts that can work with faculty and students become familiar with version control systems could be one avenue of support. They could be extremely helpful for support both in and outside of the classroom, could help to manage an online portfolio for departmental software, etc.

Being a resource for existing groups would likely be the biggest piece of the puzzle. Funding, knowledge about local hackathons, contacts with local businesses, or simply having stuff to give to students to get them interested can be great resources as well.


(Vicente Cubells) #35

Module 4 Exercise 1

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

My university (Tecnológico de Monterrey) has 31 campus in Mexico. I have had working in campus Santa Fe for 10 years. I am one of the professors promoting the Open Source community and the use of GitHub in programming classes, principally. There are some students communities involve in hackathons, bootcamps, programming days, an so on, with support of partners. There are a bit of courses incorporating and using tools like GitHub and only a few students and teachers have knowledge about Student Developer Pack. I think this is a great opportunity to promote the use of this tools.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

All GitHub Education programs are great and will can support skills development on our students. But, one big opportunity will be to impulse the GitHub Campus Experts program. In this way, we will generate a snowball effect between students communities.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

Teaching teachers and students how to use and incorporate this tools in all programming and tech classes.


(Ryan Schuetzler) #36

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

We’ve got some great technical student communities. One great one that I think GitHub would fit really well with is a new Open Source club that is just starting on campus with (I think) collaboration or support from Mozilla. The goal is to encourage students to engage with open source software communities.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

The GitHub developer pack is awesome. I just wish I could guarantee that my students would have all that stuff available when they take my classes. As it is, some of them have already signed up previously for personal interest, or for other classes. Either way, the tools and free stuff in there is great for students getting started in development. I remember using it myself to get started with DigitalOcean and GitHub not too long ago.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I’m not sure there’s much left for me to do. Students are now starting their own clubs in interested areas. I would like to get something going around the conversational technology I use for my research, so maybe that’ll be the direction I take.


(Paola Corrales) #37

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

There are many technical communities in my faculty, for example, the students of the computer department. However, the atmospheric and oceanic science community is a bit away from these communities. We are few people in the field. One of the biggest problems is that it does not give the importance of programming, coding and tools like git in the degree courses. And when the students graduate they have to learn all this very quickly and stumble.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I think Campus Expert is a very interesting program that could open up new opportunities for the students and provide them with useful tools for their training and future work.
The opportunities are usually late or not coming and I think this would be a great way to keep us updated. For example I didn’t now about the Student Developer Pack when I was student.

I also think that it is very interesting the possibility of organizing hacktons both to generate a strong community and to provide a space where they can learn new skills.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I have a some plans for the near future. I want to incorporate short workshops to teach topics such as git and unix outside the classes scheduled for beginners. I would also like to put together and maintain some kind of record of opportunities for them. And finally organize meeting or hackathons!


I’m sorry por the delay to complete the last Module. I was finishing my thesis when I start this treaning and It was imposible to finish it at that time. It was very fun and instructive. I hope I can aplicate all this in my next course and more important I hope I can encourage the students to learn and use git from the begenning. Thank you very much Mozzadrella!


(Danny de Vries) #38

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

Most of the technical courses at CMDAmsterdam are hosted trough or own intranet. It’s a nice central place for teachers to host assignments and upload extra resources but it doesn’t enforce collaboration. There are almost no options for other students to peer review code and solutions other students made. Hosting trough GitHub and especially classroom makes sure students can work in teams and gain more insight in the code other people write.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

Currently, students that follow my workshops I almost immediately point them to the student developer pack. Some more senior students can even do these campus advisor modules so they can get up and running with basic git tasks of their own and get a grasp on GitHub classroom.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I’m already hosting most of my assignment through GitHub but other courses that are now served through our intranet can be better by using the social features of GitHub. Trying to get in contact with one of my supervisors at school :man_technologist:t3:


@mozzadrella Thanks for all the insights! Keep on sharing great tools for other people / teachers to learn! Finishing all the modules was a pleasure :tada:


(Joachim Francois) #39

@OmalPerera That’s a great starthub you’ve created there! Following the progress with interest!

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
We’re currently very busy in establishing a future community for the students where they can continue digging deeper on all subjects we teach at their own interest/pace. Being a shiny new education program we’ve kicked off the first year with over 150 students. The numbers/prediction for the upcoming year are in the same line. So we’re exploring all possible avenues at the moment.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
GitHub classroom surely will be something I’ll be introducing in nearly all my classes. Very glad I found the way to the education community here. So far it’s been super! (And I’m sure it’ll stay like this too :slight_smile: ) .

The Education pack for the students is packed with lots of super stuff! I’ll gladly introduce this to my students and encourage them to dive into a lot of stuff that’s being offered there.

A similar Teacher pack might be a good idea :wink: ? This way we could potentially provide them with a bit more guidance in how everything works and host a few labs with the range of tools provided.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
We’re currently making a lot of plans and testing what we can in classes running this year. Based on the feedback of our students we’ll be making some decissions during the summer holiday so we can attempt to plant a couple of fresh seeds at the start of next year :wink:

@mozzadrella Is there a follow up on the 4 Modules? Something that even dives deeper into git and the github integrations?

Regardless, this was a brilliant way to introduce git and github in combination with the classroom functionality! I’ve enjoyed the modules a lot!


(Rohith Pudari) #40

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
We’ve been trying to use gitHub a lot more in my university over the last few years. The web theme within our CS degree with a big push on using industry standard tech (gitHub etc.) which has helped a lot. We have a really active compSoc that run several events throughout the year, with this including hackathons.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
I really liked the idea of the github Campus Experts and am going to be showing this to some of our students that are already really active in helping others. It’s nice to see something like this that goes beyond the skills that we can teach in the classroom and rewards students for going that extra mile!

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
I think that the growth of the communities just takes time and involvement, its more building up a cultural change than anything that can be fixed quickly. However, in terms of building up the use of real world tools, and getting more people using things like gitHub, courses like this one are amazing! Having the activities and the accompanying slide PDFs are very handy and it’s given a nice simple way to introduce gitHub to students in a way that they will be able to use.

Thanks @mozzadrella and GitHub that’s put this together!