Module 4 Exercise 1: Student programs


(Sara Marín-López) #74

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
Ubiqum is a bootcamp where you can find two different courses: Java Web Developer and Data Analytics & Machine Learning

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
The GitHub Student Developer Pack would be great, this way the students would be able of using private repositories and the free domain names for getting better jobs.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
Maybe we would need to involve students in social events like hackathons or meetups. This way they would have the opportunity to collaborate on real projects and learning from more experienced people.


(Vasil Markov) #75

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
*We are a coding bootcamp where you can find our The Java FullStack Web Developer and Data Analytics & Machine Learning.
2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
*Oh here without any doubt, “The GitHub Student Developer Pack”. It’s full of helfull and amazing staff.
3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
*Here the best option will be hackathons, where the students can meet with other people united from the same interests get experience working on a real projects.


(Dr. Ayaz H. Khan) #76

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
We have several student clubs but nothing specific for Students Collaboration using GitHub.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

Students can work on projects using GitHub developers pack.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

We need to setup software development competitions using the GitHub developers pack.


(Isg75) #77

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
Ubiqum is a bootcamp where you can find two different courses: Java Web Developer and Data Analytics & Machine Learning

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
Git knowledge will definitivelly help our students to get hired as I’m starting to see job offers asking about git knowledge

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
May be to promote hackathons


(Yann Thierry-Mieg) #78
  1. Sorbonne Université is a large uni, I can mostly describe what happens in CS studies. We have a nice existing technical network, we do organize hackathon like events, we had a hub up for the Google HashCode challenge https://hashcode.withgoogle.com/ for instance, but also other more local events like “La nuit de L’info” https://www.nuitdelinfo.com/. There are also smaller clubs doing stuff like drones, robotics, AI, etc…
  2. Yeah, well the classroom component is the one I’d like to try. We are currently set up using separate gitlab that we administrate, the workflow is OK, but could be better. So students submit work by pushing to their fork of the exercise depot + we hang CI on it to run tests.
  3. We would need to welcome you to make a talk I think, or maybe if we can get a bag of goodies, that would grow our community as well. More seriously we have plenty of that, most of them already using github in one way or another.

(Nathan Eloe) #79
  1. We have several organizations on campus: ACM/ACM-W/ACM-G, Cyber Defense Club, etc. We also have a Programming Competition team that trains to take place in ACM style programming competitions at conferences. Any student can join these groups, though their direction is more student driven (and so may be different each year).

  2. I would love to see students try to take advantage of the Campus Expert program and by extension the GitHub Internship program. Our Department (shcool, actually) very strongly pushes for internships for our students, so expanding that program would bean incredible boon for our students.
    I would also love to have a hackathon style competition for our students, so the availability of the hackathon grant is exceptionally interesting to me.

  3. One of the biggest hurdles is always administrator (and IT) buy in. However, our school is very big on profession based learning; working with a company that produces tools and experiences that our students would use on a regular basis in the “real world” would go a long way in securing administrator support. Additionally the availability of tools and resource for my students to use at no cost (and no additional support time from the IT department)allows me and my students to start being more creative with what our communities can do.


(Christian Nievas) #80

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
Many people know and use git but they don’t announce it sometimes to the students. So my plans are being GitHub Expert (I sent the request recently) and start to publish courses about GitHub.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
GitHub developer pack is amazing because the pro GitHub features used for example to create private repositories to upload the practices exercises that is required.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
May be to promote hackathons in Argentina, Buenos Aires.


(Chris Cannon) #81

:100: Hope you saw the announcement this week that we have added several very high demand products to the Student Developer Pack! :sparkles:


(Chris Cannon) #82

Great stuff @mhudnell! I look forward to meeting some motivated Chapel Hill students through programs like Campus Experts!


(Chris Cannon) #83

Looking forward to seeing your students put this to use!


(Chris Cannon) #84

Make sure you check this out about requesting swag for your students!


(Chris Cannon) #85

Hope to see some of your students in Campus Experts training soon! :sparkling_heart:


(Baptiste Pesquet) #86
  • Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

I work as a CS teacher in one of France’s grandes écoles, the National Engineering School of Cognitics (in French: Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Cognitique). Cognitics is a pretty recent scientific field stuying the interactions between humans and IT systems. It stands at a crossroads of diverse fields such as computer and social sciences, biology, psy- chology, but also artificial intelligence and linguistics, neurology or philosophy.

GitHub is pretty heavily used in almost all of the CS-related courses during our three years long curriculum.

  • Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

Often students come to me asking for a private repository in one of our GitHub organizations, not knowing the Student Developer Pack could give them what they need (and more!).

Some of our students would probably be interested in becoming Campus Experts. i’ll tell them about this program.

  • What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

Probably convince more colleagues in non CS-related fields to try using GitHub too :wink:


(Chris Jones) #87

Within the computer science department we have a small set of student groups, but they seem to emphasize more presentation rather than coding or software engineering. I know some of the students have participated in local hackathons, but nothing sponsored by the university or department that I know of. More importantly, there are not many instructors teaching Git much less evangelizing it’s use to students so that they could better understand how it could help them, not just with their code, but with everything else they’re working on in school.

I think the Campus Expert program would be incredibly valuable simply because it emphasizes skills beyond the technical, which our students will need to truly excel in industry. The Developer Pack would be close second since it provides access to a huge number of tools that could be used within other classes.

As far as what I’d need to encourage the growth of these kinds of communities, I think I’d need some good stories. I’ve seen, and participated in, an attempt to found a student chapter of the IEEE Computer Society on campus, and our biggest stumbling block was generating and sustaining interest. Our students have so many ways that they could spend their time that they need a compelling, tangible reason to choose to participate in a tech community over the alternatives.


(Pol Benedito Momplet) #88

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
In Ubiqum Code Academy we train people to become Full-Stack Web Developers and Data Analytics
2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
“The GitHub Student Developer Pack”.
3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
Less theory and more practise, motivate people with cool projects, no one care about theory, but everyone love cool things. People love to do things not to read about cool things that other people do.


(Jason T. Mickel) #89
  1. There are a number of informal groups but nothing that is regular and robust to my knowledge. For example, there was interest in creating a data science club; however, the interests, understandably, ebb and flow with the student population.

  2. For us, I think the Campus Experts piece would offer a great opportunity to promote good practices in code development while simultaneously training strong, active community leaders. I could picture those students using that advantage to gain internships with Github or others. In turn those students will help faculty get other students on board.

  3. For the new minor we have launched in digital culture and information, we need to begin by integrating the git/Github workflow into our processes so that our students begin to assume its use and adjust to the workflow.


(Patrick Reimers) #90

As far as I know, there aren’t any student communities. :frowning_face:

The GitHub developer pack is packed with lots of tools the students could use to learn and build own ideas. out of these ideas, communities could be created.

With the GitHub education program, I would try to convice our students to sit together and create communities. (It’s more fun when doing somthing together, than doing ot alone)


(Edward A. Roualdes) #91

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
At CSU, Chico, we have a student community named Community Coding. Community Coding is a free space, open to anybody near our campus (students, faculty, and the local community) who wants to learn more about, practice, or share their coding. Occasionally, we have presentations by local experts. We’re working on spreading the word about reproducible research and I feel that GitHub is a big part of this message.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
I wish I knew sooner about the GitHub Developer Pack. This is a great idea to help motivate students to learn new tools. I’m also excited about the potential grant for hackathons. Our campus has just started competing in ASA’s DataFest, and this money would really help us advertise more broadly.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
Let’s me start with the two thoughts above, GitHub Developer Pack and the hackathon grant money, and then go from there. This community seems quite responsive, which is great. Thanks for the responsiveness so far and in the future.


(Hhezeldin) #92

great artticle


(Héricles Emanuel) #93

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

We have the ‘Guardians’ community, which serves to acquire technological group knowledge, maintain the laboratories and develop solutions for the use of the Computer Science course. In addition, we have the PET, Tutorial Education Program, which also provides support to students and mini-courses. I feel that the areas of action of these communities are restricted. I imagine that a more open community that students could attend and teach each other would be a good idea.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I imagine that the Github Student developer pack provides materials and tools that are great for exercising the technological learning, in addition, Git as a version control tool helps the organized development of student projects and solutions. As such, GitHub Classroom allows for more detailed classroom monitoring and how projects are being developed. Through the Campus Advisor, I intend to influence the communities of my campus, and to increase the technological knowledge of the community. I also want to join the Campus Expert Program, and be able to further encourage the community.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I think the materials provided by GitHub are good. I also think that alone, the work will be more costly. So having more people I can count on would be good. I will recommend colleagues to join the program so that we can have a better outcome with the community. I hope to have the support of the course coordination to implement strategies to increase the knowledge of students and stakeholders through internal programs, hackathons, etc …
My present knowledge is still little compared to what I have yet to learn. A very important thing would be to have the help of someone who could help me gain knowledge so that I could pass it on. Apparently this will not be a problem, as I have you and the entire github education community. :heart: