Module 4 Exercise 1: Student programs


(Vanessa) #1

Module 4: Student programs

Accept Module 4

Exercise: Community assessment

  1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
  2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
  3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

(Clara) #2

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

We’ve got some general computer clubs, but nothing specific to software engineering and no GitHub experts (yet).

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

GitHub developer pack is amazing. The pro GitHub features and AWS credits are much appreciated. Hopefully students can use the free domain names for projects in the future.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

Would love to get students involved in Hackathons. Our program is a 2-year technical program at a community college, focusing on practical software development skills. Many of our students are non-traditional and have never thought about Hackathons, don’t know what they are about, or maybe don’t have the confidence to participate in one. So, resources for students - what’s a hackathon, what’s the benefits of participating, what to expect - would be very helpful.

Thanks @mozzadrella and GitHub for your support!


(François Roland) #3

1. Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
In the Faculty of Engineering, I’m one of the sole teacher teaching git to his students. Some of my colleagues even invited me to give a git session during their course. So the word is spreading and I expect that I will be invited to similar sessions next year. The good news is that, once students have received a git training, they can use this new knowledge throughout the rest of their studies.
So, I would say that the main gap is about the teachers and assistants training.
If some researchers have heard about git, most of them are still using sub-optimal systems.

2. Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?
I’m involved in our campus FabLab. I’d like to develop a community there. Which is why I’m following the campus expert program right now.

3. What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
In the FabLab, I’d like to see more sharing between the makers. I plan to use GitHub as the foundation of this sharing system (I’ve already received a discount for non-profits, thanks!).

This short campus advisor training is great! Thank you very much @mozzadrella!


(François Roland) #4

Hi @mozzadrella,

What is the next step of the Campus Advisors track.
Should we register somewhere?
Are there additional lessons?

Regards


(Vanessa) #5

We’re working on a process for that—probably will be up by next week. In the meantime, I’m manually making note of everyone who has finished. They will soon have an avatar that reflects the new status :sparkles:


(Richard) #6

Our technical student population is quite large, but there are relatively few organised groups in that community. The CS postgrad students are usually those engaged with hackathons and the like, but the group is small and many of their efforts are often limited to the CS student community, excluding the larger engineering and information systems communities at times. Within an hours drive of campus are a large number of meet ups and the like which students often participate in.

For students specially, I’m sure that the GitHub Education Pack is the most popular as it provides tools which students wouldn’t be able to afford (especially so due to the emerging economy exchange rate). For me as an educator, GitHub Classroom is going to revolutionise how I teach classes, and I’m sure the students are going to love the swag (when it - hopefully- arrives).

We are a big University, but in South Africa higher education is struggling under a huge financial burden. Any/all of these resources that you offer students/staff/programmes free of charge really helps us and is much appreciated. It would be great if there was a platform for GitHub sponsorship of local academic conferences (with huge student participation) rather than just seeing GitHub at industry conferences.

@mozzadrella - this training was a fun way of spending an afternoon. I didn’t learn too much new, but I really appreciate the effort and support that GitHub offers the education community. :champagne: Thank you. I look forward to the registration/process to become a Campus Advisor. :slight_smile:

PS: Can we clean up the repos we made on GitHub?


(Reza M) #7

No existing technical student communities yet. It is a fast paced new school for international students. Free time is mostly used to make money to pay for their student fees :frowning:

Github developer pack is pretty amazing and hoping my students take full advantage of it. Other than that, I am working hard to get the Education working with Travis for automatically correcting.

It is hard as I am not on the same agenda as the school heads and the school curriculum is too fast paste with no gaps for extra curricular activities. I am trying new things to hopefully change that and create clubs and eventually one day a hackathon for the students. Until then, I push my students to join all the hackathons happening in Montreal :slight_smile:


(Mark Michon) #8

We’re in the process of trying to put together semi-regular “meetup” style events. It’s tough in an accelerated program (courses are a month long, over two years) to develop a consistent sense of community as students enter and leave the degree. Tools like Slack have helped unite our online/campus students, as well as connect current students with recent grads.

Last year I took advantage of the “swag bag” from GitHub. Rather than holding an on campus event, I challenged all of our students to contribute to an open source project for a chance to win a shirt. It revealed a few things I was already aware of (students have confidence issues when it comes to public work), but also gave some valuable insight from those that did participate on their comfort level with collaborative version control. It was great to bring remote/online students into the fold, and I plan on ramping this up a few times a year.

Time? :slight_smile: Rapid schedules and small student bodies can make things rough. We’re working on building the skills earlier in the program so we can have all students participate in hackathons and open source challenges going forward.


(Mike Crabb) #9

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?

We’ve been trying to use gitHub a lot more in my university over the last few years. The web theme within our CS degree has been completely redeveloped headed up by @wildfireone with a big push on using industry standard tech (gitHub etc.) which has helped a lot. We have a really active compSoc that run several events throughout the year, with this including hackathons.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

I really liked the idea of the github Campus Experts and am going to be showing this to some of our students that are already really active in helping others. It’s nice to see something like this that goes beyond the skills that we can teach in the classroom and rewards students for going that extra mile!

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?

I think that the growth of the communities just takes time and involvement, its more building up a cultural change than anything that can be fixed quickly. However, in terms of building up the use of real world tools, and getting more people using things like gitHub, courses like this one are amazing! Having the activities and the accompanying slide PDFs are very handy and it’s given a nice simple way to introduce gitHub to students in a way that they will be able to use.

Thanks @mozzadrella and everyone else at GitHub that’s put this together!


(Omal Perera) #10
  • Currently in computing department of our university has about 200+ students. Since it is a state university, all of the students are enrolled in 4 year, BSc. (special) Information systems degree & IT degrees.

  • Within the University we have a good computer laboratory facilities as well as auditorium facilities with multimedia.

  • One and only technical community that supports to technical related initiatives can be identified as the computer society of the university. And I’m currently works as the Technical Lead of the computer society.

  • We often conduct technical sessions (e.g. CIS Tech-Talk) & hackathons in order to uplift the knowledge of the student community. Sometimes we have organized inter-university level hackathons too. LetMeHack 2018

  • According to my point of view, the main gap in this process is lack of resource personals & motivation to conduct sessions. We need to change the way of teaching to students with the technology, like github classroom.


  • I like to choose GitHub classroom to answer this question. It will be really helpful to both parties.

  • In our case, when we organize a hands-on code training session, we can create an individual assignment with starter code + resources for different topics (here we can add issues to assignment). So we can ask every participant to practice the code during the workshop.
    In this manner GitHub classroom can be used to communicate with students, even after the session too.

  • And also we can develop a self learning portal by maintaining a set of public assignments that describes what to do step-by-step itself & allow our students to do them & self learn from assignments whenever they are free. We can ask them to mention one of our mentors if they need a help.
    This improves the relationship between student and the mentor.


  • We have to teach essential skills in the industry to students, by arranging interesting meetups, tech talks, seminars, webinars hackathons etc.

  • One of most important factor in learning is sharing knowledge with each other. The best way to achieve that is to increase the usage of GitHub in above mentioned events & create new opportunities to teach them effectively.

  • At the same time we need to get students involved in these programs. For that, as educators we can provide small gifts, swags, & student packs in order to encourage them & motivate them.



A word about Campus-Advisor program

I accidentally saw this program on linkedin. After reading few topics, I understood that, this will be an efficient way to tech students, which I can have support.

Believe me, I really addicted to do these four modules. They were pretty interesting and the way you explain git concepts were superb. :clap:

@mozzadrella you are doing a brilliant job. :tada: Hope to work with you.

Thanks!
:wave:


(Randy Johnson) #11

I’m pretty new to the department and the program is quite new – thus our community is pretty undeveloped. There might be some other groups from other departments we could join. I’m still exploring what is available on campus and how I can help things develop in a good direction.

I like the Student Developer Pack. Lots of great services! I’ll definitely be sharing this with my students.

As for next steps: I think the first thing will be to implement some of the things I’ve learned here into my teaching. We are also in the early stages of putting together a hackathon or something similar. A lot of the initial work will be putting a strategy together with other faculty.


(Vanessa) #12

@barnsza

PS: Can we clean up the repos we made on GitHub?

The repos are private, so prune as you wish.

:slight_smile:


(Nasseef Abukamail) #13

Describe the existing technical student communities on your campus. Who is served? Where are there gaps?
The community is limited to CS and engineering students. We have a small ACM group on campus that provide activities for students on a weekly basis.

Choose one GitHub Education program. How could it support your on-campus student communities?

We introduce git in one of our CS courses but students use it along with GitHub in the senior design course. I wish students would use source control in all of their classes. I hope to introduce early to freshmen students. I would like to use GitHub classroom this Summer.

What would you need to do in order to support the growth of student tech communities on campus?
Get students involved in computer organizations such as ACM and IEEE, programming contests, and hackathons.


(Vanessa) #14

@minneapolis-edu our friends over at Major League Hacking have a pretty comprehensive index of student hackathons:

and support resources:

Through MLH, we’re happy to provide a $1,000 grant to your school’s first-time hackathon, too.


(Vanessa) #15

:sparkles: glad you found it useful @froland.

Feel free to use any of these slides and videos to teach your students–I included the PDFs so you can use as you see fit.

Keep us in the loop about the FabLab–we’re happy to send them swag as well.


(Vanessa) #16

Hi @barnsza,

It would be great if there was a platform for GitHub sponsorship of local academic conferences (with huge student participation) rather than just seeing GitHub at industry conferences.

We love academic conferences. SIGCSE is my favorite event of the year. Which ones would you like to see a larger GitHub Education presence at? Let us know and we can try to make it work. :slight_smile:


(Vanessa) #17

@MadReza thank you for doing all of the work you do.

@decause managed to include OSS as part of his curriculum at RIT–you might take a look at the wonderful resources he created for project-based learning in community:

https://magic.rit.edu/?page_id=1008


(Vanessa) #18

@markmichon your work sounds amazing.

The folks over at Delft have student groups do an analysis of an open source project first–how it works, what is the process, who they should contact. Then they reach out to a maintainer and discuss how to collaborate. It’s a longer process, and I hear you on time being a finite resource, but maybe it’s something to think about moving forward.

Delft

Here is their case study:

Delft.pdf (43.0 KB)


(Randy Johnson) #19

Also, with respect to growing communities, I’m working on some community building and training at my other job. “Students” here consist of professionals, who each have their own expertise in different areas. I’m hoping to use some of these tools in hands-on seminars to help cross-train our staff and share some of that specialized knowledge with each other.


(Vanessa) #20

@mikecrabb thanks for your kind words. As organizers ourselves, I deeply understand how culture doesn’t change overnight. Feel free to use the PDFs and materials in your courses. If you see students who are itching to be part of a community, there is that $1,000 first-time hackathon grant available: