Module 2 Exercise 4: Workflow and assignments with Classroom


(Ygor Canalli) #81
  1. I will keep only assignments.
  2. I expect they commit weekly
  3. Simple, just for remember what they did
  4. Yes, i encourage using GitHub for all school projects




(Chris Cannon) #82

@ygorcanalli when you say commit weekly, do you mean that students will have one assignment per week? Or that they will work on an assignment over a longer period of time and only commit once a week?


(Ygor Canalli) #83

They would have one assignment per week. Forgive my bad english.


(Chris Cannon) #84

I manage my course in much the same way, but I have 2 organizations at any given time. One organization stays from semester to semester and holds public, resource repositories as well as the private repositories that serve as the starter code for my assignments.

Then, I use GitHub classroom and a specific classroom organization (NCAT-COMP167-Fall2018) to hold students assignments each semester.


(Chris Cannon) #85

Looks great @CharlotteMorrison! Look forward to hearing about how your students like GitHub


(Charlotte Morrison) #86

My students used it for the first time this week. I actually have one student that has used Github for years so I let him lead the lesson while I worked with the students that were struggling. We are using Eclipse so they can connect right in the IDE and load the assignment easily. I am going to wait to have them work with the command line until they have a better conceptual understanding of what is happening. They seem to grasp the idea of commits, master branch, pull/push, and why it is important to have source control.

For some of them this is very foreign, many of my students are not typical AP kids, they don’t generally take AP or advanced courses (I have a few advanced kids though) and some had no interest in computers as freshman and have developed one over the 2-3 I have had them. I must say, one of the coolest parts of my job is taking students that are otherwise uninterested in computing at the start of HS and gradually showing them how cool it is. I had two of my girls message me over the summer that they had changed their major in college to computing as a result of my classes- and from trying out other areas and realizing how interesting computing is in comparison.

So we will take this step by step, and differentiate our use. Some kids will be ready for more advanced skills, but some may only be able to to work through the IDE. Knowing this group of kids though, they really caught on quickly- usually they tend to have all kinds of whiny problems when new things are introduced! I think they felt very professional and were glad to be away from software designed for “kids” that is goofy and immature. My student that already uses Github verified that this is a “real world” tool that they will need in college and in a career, so they felt very adult using it.

My plan is to use this with my web design courses after I get more comfortable with it in my AP Computer Science A and Principles courses. The instruction would be more scaled down and simplified so they can be familiar with Github when they get to the higher courses. I am also excited to use this for group collaboration later this year!

Charlotte


(Chris Cannon) #87

That’s so awesome @CharlotteMorrison! Seeing a student transfer from uninterested and skeptical about their own abilities to confident and enjoying their work is great! I’m sure as they grow more advanced these “real world” tools are a welcome change for juniors and seniors who are very much outgrowing scratch and code blocks! Have you looked into GitHub pages at all for your web design class? It’s easily one of the simplest ways to get code hosted on a website quickly and if you’re already planning on using GitHub it ties in seamlessly, of course.


(Docmilo) #88

I intend using GitHub as follows

Course materials stored on BBL VLE. Will be using GitHub to:

  • Distributing solutions to weekly laboratory exercises
  • Distributing assignments to students (starter code, instructions)
  • GitHub classroom for accepting and managing assignment submissions from students
  • Enabling students to work collaboratively on group based code projects

No schedule will be enforced regarding commits.

Informative and concise messages for commits will be encouraged

I expect students to push their code when they have made significant progress towards solving each assignment task or added a new feature.

I encouraged students to use GitHub last year for group assignments but didn’t enforce the approach. This year I will adopt a much more formal and structured approach to using GitHub in the class.


(Ivonetafe) #89

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    Only selected assignments will be stored in the repository. Course materials will continue to be stored in the college’s Learning Management System (Blackboard).
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    They should commit when they have coded AND tested a new feature. Different features should ideally be committed separately.
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Commit messages should have a meaningful description explaining what change they have made.
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    They should regularly commit and then push changes to the remote repository. This will provide a backup for their code and make progress visible.

(Chris Cannon) #90

This is really interesting to me. Would you mind sharing kind of reports do you require from students with their code submissions? Do you find that this increases student retention/focuses them on learning objectives?


(Chris Cannon) #91

This is my absolute favorite part of GitHub tools for assignments, being able to have conversations about it in context where we can give meaningful feedback to students.


(Chris Cannon) #92

:raised_hands:

I always tell my students that at the minimum they should push at the end of every work session, before they log off their computer.


(Lescano Micaela) #93
  1. I will keep one repository per assigment and per student.
  2. When achieving a goal.
  3. Meaninful commits that relate to the work done.
  4. At the end of the day at least.


(Jaime Rabasco Ronda) #94
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    One repository per assigment per student
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    I expect my students to commit frequently so they will have a correct versions control about their repository
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Description about their goals
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    Al least before of due date


(Adarshreddy adelli) #95

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    just assignments and course material link.
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    when they have commited and compiled.
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Thier achievements and doubts.
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    On or before due date

(Claudio Santoro) #96
  • Exercise: How might you imagine using this tool for your courses?
    • GitHub Classroom it’s ideal for any kind of workflow that requires group or individual work, from Hackathons, for Group Projects, Exercises, Exams and Practices, even for just writing the class content. GitHub Classroom certainly allow me to track who is engaging with the content, and with ProBot or HuBot and GitHub Integrations this can even deploy for further places.
  • Exercise: Workflow:
    • 1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
      • Yes, since GH Classroom allows me to use a base repository I could store all the needed materials (videos, guides, and examples) that could be benefit for the assignee to conclude his work.
    • 2. When will you expect students to commit?
      • This varies from assignment to assignment, if the exercise asks for creating lists of food recipes, for an example, each commit should generally contain a new markdown file with a new recipe.
    • 3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
      • This depends of the methodology used on the assignment, we could just write story telling commit messages, or more technical commit messages depending on what the student is doing.
    • 4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
      • Always as possible. Sharing code and their workflow is the best way of getting to know their compromises and progress on their assignments, also this ensures they learn about new projects and FOSS.


I’m using GitHub Classroom for managing Hackathons, we did a Hackathon with more than 800 Hackers, and from them approx 400 developers, many of them created their first account on GitHub at that time. It was amazing!

Also the 1millionwomentotech was another amazing example with thousands of people creating amazing stuff.

GitHub Classroom is a life saver!


(Diego Fernando Marin) #97

Module 2 Exercise 5 done!

Yes, i’ll publish course material and assignments into the repository of the course

Every time the add new code of refactor existing code, they should commit.

They should use a description of the change they made. Short but relevant.

At least once every day.


(Isg75) #98

Hi,

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Only assignements

2… When will you expect students to commit?

Every day before leaving the campus.

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

A short statement of what change they introduced in the code

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Every day.

Here is my classroom


(Vasil Markov) #99
  1. One repository per assigment and per student. The course materials will be stored in the academy webpage.
  2. Once they complete each goal.
  3. Commits that are relate to the task done.
  4. At the end of the day or at least tree times a week.


(Amy Dickens) #100

Thanks for submitting the screen shot - do you also have some comments about the questions asked about workflow? :sparkles: