Module 2 Exercise 4: Workflow and assignments with Classroom


(Dave Avis) #201
  • Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    Course materials are in our LMS; assignments are in GitHub Classroom.

  • When will you expect students to commit?
    At the end of each class, or at the completion of an assignment.

  • What sort of commit messages should they use?
    I’m not worrying about that, yet.

  • When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    At the end of each class, or at the completion of an assignment. The lab computers reset randomly so this should prevent lost work.


(Nguyễn Đức Chiến) #202
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    => I’m currently keeping my labs and assignments in GitHub classroom, and the presentations, learning materials I stored on Google Drive.

  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    => In a project, I often split up into small jobs, each small job has small actions and I will take that as a basis for students to commit. Sometimes there are errors that need to be fixed immediately, and that could be a commit. I hope that students will soon get used to this rhythm

  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    => I encourage students to speak briefly in the title and describe in more detail on Github

  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    => At least at the end of each job, I can know what work the student has been doing. But I often encourage students to push after a certain commit, meaning a commit that probably won’t need to merge or fix any errors.


(Umangshuklait) #203
  • Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    Ans: i am planning to add my practical assignment to git classroom and will also post assignment on git classroom.
  • When will you expect students to commit?
    commit as per flow of project flow. need to commit as per lab work
  • What sort of commit messages should they use?
    ans: required to write each and every detail for specific understanding
    *When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    ans: at end of every lab they can give submission.
    .

(Emanuel Kitzelmann) #204
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    I think I’m going to have one main repo for orga and course materials and one repo per assignment. Invitation links to the assignment repos will be listed in the readme.md of the main repo.

  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    When something significantly has changed or been added. It depends on how experienced the students are. Beginners probably commit smaller steps than advanced learners.

  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Shortly describe what was changed/added.

  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    When a requirement of the assignment has been achieved or a single exercise is finished. Always at the end of the lesson so that students can checkout and continue their work at home and at home so that they are up to date for the next lesson.


(Christophe Troestler) #205

Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Only the assignments.

When will you expect students to commit?

As their project is taking shape—their progress will be discussed during the classes.

What sort of commit messages should they use?

They will have to respect good practices.


(Christophe Troestler) #206


(Guido) #207

1 - I will keep all general course material in a separate organization’s repository. Then I will keep a repository for every assignment.
2 - I will expect students to commit may times
3 - I will expect general comment and maybe I will use a tag or a mention (@) to ask the teacher
4 - When they want.

@mozzadrella nice 90s punkrock weasels quote in the video :crazy_face::cowboy_hat_face:


(Harshit Dwivedi) #208
  • Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    I’ll be adding both my course materials and assignments in a repo.

  • When will you expect students to commit?
    I’ll expect them to push a commit for every completed step in the assignmnt.

  • What sort of commit messages should they use?
    they should follow the standard commit guidelines with proper prefixes like fix, feat, refactor etc. depending on the nature of work done.

  • When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    At end of every week.


(Yair Yarom) #209
  • Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    We currently use moodle for the course materials, so just the assignments.

  • When will you expect students to commit?
    For each workable change. We want to see that they work orderly.

  • What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Descriptive. Most assignments are not that long, so long commit messages are
    usually irrelevant.

  • When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    More or less daily. They need to “save” their work at the end of the day, and
    we want to see that they started to work on it not a day before the deadline.


(Othniel Dona Monote) #210

I’ll create different repos for different assignments. I might add course materials to assignments were applicable. I’ll expect my students to commit every unit or subsection of the assignment or major modifications. I’ll expect concise but descriptive commit messages. After every major task or section is completed they’ll have to push their code.

  • Distributing assignments


(Christoph B. Wurzinger) #211


(Stephen Cerruti) #212
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

I keep assignments and example code from lectures.

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

I expect scholars to commit:

  1. After every class
  2. Whenever they add a new feature or resolve an issue
  3. Prior to the assignment due date
  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Scholars should use commit messages that assist them in the reflection of the process they used to create their code. This is especially important for AP CSP exam as scholars are scored on their written description of problems they encountered and how they resolved them.

On small projects simply stating what was accomplished is sufficient.

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Frequently. I don’t trust local storage. At a minimum they need to push prior to the deadline. I don’t give grades for pushing but I’m not very sympathetic to work lost because of not pushing.

image


(Kanda Runapongsa Saikaew) #213

Dear @mozzadrella

Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

I will keep only assignments in a repository. Other materials have been kept in Google Drive or Dropbox.

When will you expect students to commit?

I expect students to commit each time that he/she successfully incorporates a new feature.

What sort of commit messages should they use?

They should use short but meaningful commit messages.

When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

At least when they finish each problem of the assignment, but if it’s possible, I want my students to push every time that they commit.

Thank you for your slide and exercise.
-Kanda


(Peter Frühwirt) #214
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    Currently it is planned to use it just for assignments

  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    after every completed milestone, e.g. feature is complete or some progress was made

  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    The should use a normal commit message telling what changed prefixed with the assignment task, e.g. Story1: Added feature x

  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    Code should be pushed after every commit, but latest at deadline.


(SCDay) #215

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments? Just assignments
  2. When will you expect students to commit? yes
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use? what happened or why they are committing
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub? once its finalized

(Ronald Chua) #216

My aim is to keep all course materials under one roof; easier for students to look up stuffs. At the moment, I think I’ll expect at least one commit every 2 weeks (there are non-code aspects of the project they need to work on as well). As for the commit message, it suffices as long as it summarizes the “achievement” the commit made. Likewise, I expect at least one push every 2 weeks, or whenever they have questions that involve me reviewing their code remotely.

We have only one major assignment for this course, shown in the screenshot below.


(Levi Sterling) #217

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Only assignments will be kept in the repository, as we already have a LMS to manage other course materials.

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

“When you need to save, you need to commit” Every time a student thinks I should save, I tell them that’s the right time to commit.

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Students should NOT include name or date as that is already provided (they often think they need to put it in, but it just makes for extra work and too much to read. They should include which files they edited, and a brief description of what they edited, and the desired outcome.

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Students should push daily at a minimum.

Exercise: Distributing assignments

  1. Create an organization with your course materials for one assignment in a repository.
  2. Create a Classroom, and an individual assignment.
  3. Send it to a colleague to accept.
  4. Take a snapshot of your teacher dashboard and post it below.


(Mandy Neumann) #218
  1. Course material usually resides in our LMS, so it will be just the assignments.
  2. I want to encourage them to commit in short intervals, one logical chunk at a time.
  3. Commit messages should be a concise summarization of the work they have done.
  4. I think they should also push rather frequently, not just an hour before the final deadline. I plan to have an assignment spanning several weeks but every week some specific part of the assignment has to be completed so I want to see at least 1 push a week.

Done (almost, I’ll have to wait for the approval of educational discount, and I need to think of meaningful assignments to create the templates).


(James Munroe) #219

Exercise: How might you imagine using this tool for your courses?

  • I like the invitation aspect of GitHub classroom. It provides more control than having a generic, public link from which sample code is downloaded.
  • The same mechanism (that is GitHub) can be used for distributing the assignment, receiving the completed assignment from the student, and providing personalized feedback to the student.
  • I often use Jupyter Notebooks to provide starter code to my students. I’ll need to investigate how well this will play with GitHub classroom.

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Probably only create unique repositories for material that I want to students to modify and submit (such as assignments). A single organization wide repo for more static materials (like lecture notes) could be shared between students.

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

At the end of each ‘session’ of work. Commit early, commit often!

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Recommend having the students what part of the assignment they were working on in the commit. Encourage git commits as logical, atomic units.

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Obviously to submit but also before coming to request assistance from faculty or TAs.

Here’s a Classroom with new assignments set up:


(Subramanya Vajiraya) #220

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    Ans: Probably not, while git is great at managing code and text files, not so great for managing PDFs, MS Word docs and videos. Most of our assessments include submitting reports in PDF format. So, I would let LMS handle all those and use git for Code Assignments.
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    Ans: Every step of the way. I would want to see how students think when solving problems.
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Ans: Most of our coding assignments have different objectives or checkpoints. I would want them to include those in the commit message. This allows me to track their progress and thought process in a better way.
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    Ans: I would want students to push code to github as they go. This allows me to track their progress real-time and jump in if they need help.

Exercise: Distributing assignments

  1. Create an organization with your course materials for one assignment in a repository.
  2. Create a Classroom, and an individual assignment.
  3. Send it to a colleague to accept.
  4. Take a snapshot of your teacher dashboard and post it below.