Module 2 Exercise 4: Workflow and assignments with Classroom


(Jstaso) #181
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    I think for our organization it may be best to keep course materials on our LMS for consistency with other programs. I’m excited to use github for assignments, however.

  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    Ideally any time they break or are done working for the day.

  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Something professional that explains what they did so they can use it as a record for later reflections. I’ll need to research professional language for commit message best practices.

  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    When they are finished with the assignment.


(Jared Rigby) #182


(Roman Yasinovskyy) #183
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    • I’d keep all the code in a repo, including code templates and code written in class.
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    • I’d prefer them to commit early and often, but I do realize that some of them will commit the whole assignment right before pushing it.
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    • Hopefully, descriptive
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    • Either before the due date or any time they want me to provide any feedback. it helps if I can make comments right next to the code.


(Mahesh Chugani) #184

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

I plan on keeping all course materials in repositories. Makes it easier for students to access all the necessary materials on GitHub, rather than spreading it around several different locations.

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

Often…whenever they have made a “reasonable” amount of change. At the very least, once every period.

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Meaningful messages…so it is clear to someone (eg: me, their instructor) who has not done the change/modification, exactly what change was made.

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Whenever they have a meaningful commit. At the very least, once every class period.

Exercise: Distributing assignments

  1. Create an organization with your course materials for one assignment in a repository.
  2. Create a Classroom, and an individual assignment.
  3. Send it to a colleague to accept.
  4. Take a snapshot of your teacher dashboard and post it below.

The snapshot is of 2 parts…one showing the assignment, and the other showing the student (me).


(PEDRO GONZALEZ YANES) #185
Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Yes. A repository for each course.
When will you expect students to commit?
Whenever they want
What sort of commit messages should they use?
A short and clear message.
When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
After each commit


(Asem) #186

I do for both.

For each weekly assignment.

The kind that indicates their steps towards solving the assignment.

A week after each assignment announcement.

Done.


(Domincl) #187

1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository?
All code and other coding artifacts will be in GitHub. Learning material like PowerPoint and pdf will be kept in institutional Learning Management System.

2. When will you expect students to commit?
They should commit early and often but it is left to them to experiment. They will be introduce to TDD later in program.

3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
The class is writing intensive so student are expected to be able to communicate effectively in writing. TA should be able to understand the scope and status of the assignment by looking at written artifact including readme and commit messages.

4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
They need minimally to push their code to GitHub before evaluation but in practice most of the assignment require team work and should require pushing to GitHub more often.


(Irina) #188
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

For now, I plan to only keep assignments (one repo - one assignment), and distribute other course materials via campus system

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

Often, whenever they make unit code modifications. For the assignments, I expect them to commit throughout the week that they work on it. Part of the grade will be the frequency and quality of commits.

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Short, but to the point so it’s clear what kind of change has been implemented.

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Preferably at the end of each working period, and even more often in case they work for the long time straight so the code on GitHub is most up to date.

And here is my teacher board with a first test student.


(Lebedevdes) #189
  1. I think that I will start with only assignments and in the future I will also add all course materials in a repository.
  2. Most often, students do everything at the last moment.
    Therefore, it makes sense to split tasks for more assignments so that there is more deadlines.
  3. These should be short messages explaining the stage of the solution assignments.
  4. It is better if students push each time when they complete a part of the assignments, although they can do it just before the deadline.

(Brian Emilius) #190

The way I’ve used GitHub Classroom up till now is that I have put starter code, as well as examples, and assignment descriptions in repositories. One repo for each assignment. Our material lives in the college LMS.
I also use our LMS to distribute the assignment links.

I expect students to commit as often as possible. I tell them jokingly that a commit every 5 minutes keeps the teacher away.
But the point I make to them is that they should commit every time they’ve made a meaningful change or addition to their code. We follow the atomic commit rule of thumb.

I am a fan of the imperative verb approach to writing a commit message. The commit message should tell me what I will get from implementing the specific commit.
Therefor “Add empty readme.md” is better than “Added empty readme.md”

My students push code to GitHub often. Several times a day. This is when they work on individual assignments. As a teacher I use this to keep track of my students work, and I can easily catch mistakes or give them real-time feedback as they work.


(Sarah Dukes) #191

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

I will likely begin with just assignments and work up to all material.

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

After any important additions/changes to their code. To start I will probably have them do this at the end of each class when working on an assignment. Hopefully it will become a habit for them after some practice.

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Brief but descriptive - they should be meaningful comments (ie. not commit1, commit2, etc.)

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

I’m not sure yet. I’m new to GitHub so I’m not sure if it would be best after every commit or only at specified times.


(Nasseef Abukamail) #192


(José Luis Raffalli) #193

Exercise: Workflow

  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Not all course materials, but some of them related to each specific assignment. At our campus we often use Google Classroom to store other materials such as books and presentations.

  1. When will you expect students to commit?

I would help my students to learn to segment tasks and user stories. I would expect each time they complete small tasks to commit their work.

  1. What sort of commit messages should they use?

Brief but descriptive as others said.
They can develop a kind of tag communication to identify the type of commit or work done, many developers use emojis for example. If there were problems with something, they must specify it to have good practices in collaborative work.

  1. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

I want them to push their code when they complete some sort of milestone or feature, that end users or even developers during “development” can use. Functional, quality and architectural requirements are important to be delivered as soon as possible to the central repository.


(Cynthia Teeters) #194
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments? It will probably be a combination of the two. Some material will be in our LMS. I usually use the README.md file to put assignment directions.
  2. When will you expect students to commit? I will allow students to commit as often as they want up to when the assignment is due but I will encourage them to do it often.
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use? Commit messages will need to reflect the changes made to their code
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?I will encourage then to do that often
  • Exercise: Distributing assignments
  1. Create an organization with your course materials for one assignment in a repository.
  2. Create a Classroom, and an individual assignment.
  3. Send it to a colleague to accept.
  4. Take a snapshot of your teacher dashboard and post it to the Education Community.


(Eric Allen) #195
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    Looking into what our teachers can use. Most likely most of the course materials will be in the LMS and assignments in GitHub Classroom.
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    As they do work and at a minimum before the assignment is due
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Description of the changes/additions that they added with that commit.
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    throughout the assignment process.


(Dominique Charlebois) #196
  1. Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?
    I’ll be keeping all course material in 1 repository, and assignments will be there own repositories.
  2. When will you expect students to commit?
    Before the next class.
  3. What sort of commit messages should they use?
    Descriptive commit messages. Ex. “Started Assignment”, “Added addition function.”
  4. When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?
    Every time they contribute.

  1. Create an organization with your course materials for one assignment in a repository.
  2. Create a Classroom, and an individual assignment.
  3. Send it to a colleague to accept.
  4. Take a snapshot of your teacher dashboard and post it to the Education Community.


(Robert Ulmer) #197

Hi my 2.4 / 2.5 assignment


(Shangni Hu) #198

Will you keep all course materials in a repository? Or just assignments?

Mostly assignment maaterial!

mozzadrella:

When will you expect students to commit?

Throughout their project, as per necessary by feature. Promoting the use of commit and push.

mozzadrella:

What sort of commit messages should they use?

A descriptive, concise message, think of one that they would read and know what the commit was generally about.

mozzadrella:

When do you want your students to push their code to GitHub?

Each time they commit hopefully.