Best Git Client for Labs?


(Chris Cannon) #1

I currently face a dilemma on using git in our labs. Because the lab workstations are managed remotely, it seems that GitHub desktop’s single-user simple install prevents it from being able to be installed remotely. This results in students having to re-download the software every week (as their local files are wiped routinely so previous installs go away). Is there a client anyone uses that is simple for new git users and can easily be installed to multli-user remote systems?


(Eric Kuha) #2

This is actually a serious problem.

My solution is going to be to use Cloud9. You need a credit card to create an account (though there’s a free tier), but for $1 a month, you can sign up for an educational account so that students don’t need a credit card to register.

They can then link it to their github accounts and clone it directly into a new workspace in cloud9, Then normal git terminal commands work just fine. This depends a lot on what kind of class you’re teaching, but for my javascript class, it should work well.


(Vanessa) #3

@ccannon94

David Malan from Harvard walks through his Cloud 9 integration with these slides:

And you can see the walkthrough in this video (around min 30):


(Eric Kuha) #4

What a coincidence! I was at that very talk back in March.


(Terry Nguyen) #5

Does your software stack involve any tools that integrate some Git functionality?

My students make use of Visual Studio, which has some built-in tooling for Git repositories. It also supports an official GitHub extension that makes it trivial to clone projects from GitHub.


(Claudio Santoro) #6

I really need to say, that didn’t liked this new GitHub Desktop made in Electron.

It’s so much weird. (Not only the design) but on my opinion Electron forces to much what was the proposal of HTML and Javascript, noah?

Actually I don’t like so much Node.js, and Electron, because they’re made for Lazy developers. They really facilite a lot of things, but the performance goes to the hell and speed also tho.

Using HTML and Javascript to develop desktop multiplataform applications it’s a little… weird on my humble opinion.

Anyways, already developed on Node and Electron. I also think that NPM and all those new branded Javascript Frameworks are such little overdoing the concept behinds Netscape’s Javascript. That was intended to manipulate DOM an X-Path based elements and create scripts.

Javascript wasn’t made for web at all… But anyways, OK…

Going on topic again, surely the best git client it’s the Git itself, on the CLI :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:


(topher mykolyk) #7

Our students interact with git almost exclusively through the terminal, only using github for initial repo setup, forking, team/collaborator additions. The students find it more empowering to learn this toolkit, and it also leaves them with a more portable skill set.